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Wednesday, July 27, 2005


Fireflies. Admittedly, a weird shot in the dark. I was trying to use the same approach that I used with lightning -- trying to take a series of rapid-fire shots, in hopes that I'd catch the fireflies with their lights on at the same time. All I can say is that it is easier to photograph a lightning strike. I managed to catch these three fireflies all lit up at the same time, but the shutter speed was so slow that they appear as streaks. For my UK visitors -- do you have fireflies over there?? They are wonderful little insects that come out around sunset in the summer.

6 comments:

Rock said...

I've shot fireflies many times. My method is to set my tripod mounted camera focus to any fixed point (manual focus), set to bulb, F8.0 and ISO 100. I lock the shutter open while covering the lens with a piece of black velvet covered cardboard. I then try to time my removing the cardboard with the brightest burst of fireflies. I usually leave the lens open for about 1/2 to 3 seconds. I then release the cable release and the shutter. This is the same method I use for fireworks shots.

ian said...

Lightning obviously does not strike twice!

As far as I know, we do not get fireflies over here, thouigh I have seen them many times on my visits to US.

Great to get an insight into Rock's technique.

Lara Barrett said...

Oh, I love fireflies, and I like the way you've caught their movement--they look like tiny comets!

G N Bassett said...

My kids used to collect them in a jar at night. I have no particular love for insects, but I always made the kids let them go when the evening was over. They seem too delightful and harmless to just let die.

Leigh said...

We don't have those over here - and if we did (even if they don't bite) I would get bitten or burnt by one ;-) Great shot!

Guinevere Meadow said...

We don't have them in Florida, but we had them when I was growing up in Missouri! We used to chase them in the yard. :)